Monday, 12 September 2016

Bad Little Children's Books: Kidlit Parodies, Shameless Spoofs and Offensively Tweaked Covers by Arthur C. Gackley (Abrams)

Oh dear...! Not one that I could possibly review on Read It, Daddy this one. Despite the appearance, this anthology of spoofs and parodies of "Golden Age" children's picture books - by fictional author Arthur C. Gackley, is definitely not one for kids. In fact you will have to hide this away from their prying eyes, lest they feast their peepers on some pretty questionable stuff.

"Bad Little Children's Books" is an idea that's been floating around on the Internet for quite a while. Classic children's book covers are subtly 'tweaked' for shits and giggles, spawning an ever-increasing whirlwind of madness and hilarity for those of you with a distinctly warped sense of humour, the sort of kids who spent way too much time hovering over anthills with magnifying glasses in our misspent youth.

The cover sets the table for what you'll find inside pretty well - an image of a lactose-intolerant little girl yakking up her morning milk. It really doesn't get much better from there...

Eek. 

The core idea isn't that bad, but some of the jokes fell hopelessly flat while others were the sort of jokes you nervously laugh at if a colleague at work blurts one out during coffee time.

Ack.
As I said at the top of the review, you really don't want this getting into the hands of your little ones!

Slightly worrying that I can think of a handful of folk who would probably love this as a christmas pressie stocking filler, and I can well imagine it doing very well in the run up to the yuletide season. It wanted to be cleverer than it actually was though, parodies really only work on me if they're smartly intelligent AND funny, not just the equivalent of someone farting into a cushion then holding it over your face.

"Bad Little Children's Books" by Arthur C. Gackley is out now, published by Abrams.

Thursday, 7 July 2016

Saga Volume 6 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

Hello dark blog, it's been a while. I had to come and revisit you purely to talk about Saga Volume 6 which dropped into my hands a couple of days ago.

There comes a time in every comic fan's life where they reach a point in a long-running series where they start to wonder if they're just spinning their wheels waiting for 'something' to happen.

Saga, one of the most refreshing and original comics in decades, has wowed me consistently. Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples have designed a grown-up comic world that has always felt like it's talking about ordinary everyday life situations put through a blender on the highest speed setting, whizzed up into a surreal sci-fi smoothie that you can't help but guzzle down in one greedy gulp.

Actually make that 6 greedy gulps so far because, without following the comics themselves and just waiting for each collection as I do, you really are on a slow burn with this series as we follow the exploits of an interstellar child, the product of a man and a woman who should be trying to kill, not kiss, each other.

Hazel is the pint-sized narrator for Saga, talking about her life from birth to now - and the 'now' sees Hazel as a toddling kindergarten kid who has probably seen and experienced far more than any kid should have.

Her parents, Marko and Alana switch from being fugitives on the run in this volume, to parents who will stop at nothing to get their daughter back after she was kidnapped at the end of Volume 5.

Hounded by Prince Robot IV, the once-enemies now join forces to find their children, marooned across the galaxy.

Saga's genius has always been in the way that it underpins the main storyline with sub-plots that feel scintillatingly saucy and no holds barred. We catch up with The Will, who has become fat and docile and even more mentally unstable than ever before since the death of his sister and his former lover. The Will is also hunting for Prince Robot IV's offspring to exact a terrible revenge.

Hazel's story is still as fresh and vital as in previous volumes though there were times where I felt this volume lost a head of steam it had been gathering nicely. Still though, there are seldom few comics that can do uber-violent sexy and feminist all within the space of a few pages. In some ways it keeps reminding me of a more adult and risque version of Lexx, the genius surreal sci fi series from the 90s that really ended way before it was due. I'm not really sure why.

Vaughan and Staples know where they're heading with this. We don't yet, but I get the feeling that this is a series that could carry on for a very long time to come. So in answer, it hasn't quite reached that point where the series has lost traction. Grab the collected first three volumes now, and then guzzle down the rest as soon as you possibly can.

Monday, 12 September 2016

Bad Little Children's Books: Kidlit Parodies, Shameless Spoofs and Offensively Tweaked Covers by Arthur C. Gackley (Abrams)

No comments:
Oh dear...! Not one that I could possibly review on Read It, Daddy this one. Despite the appearance, this anthology of spoofs and parodies of "Golden Age" children's picture books - by fictional author Arthur C. Gackley, is definitely not one for kids. In fact you will have to hide this away from their prying eyes, lest they feast their peepers on some pretty questionable stuff.

"Bad Little Children's Books" is an idea that's been floating around on the Internet for quite a while. Classic children's book covers are subtly 'tweaked' for shits and giggles, spawning an ever-increasing whirlwind of madness and hilarity for those of you with a distinctly warped sense of humour, the sort of kids who spent way too much time hovering over anthills with magnifying glasses in our misspent youth.

The cover sets the table for what you'll find inside pretty well - an image of a lactose-intolerant little girl yakking up her morning milk. It really doesn't get much better from there...

Eek. 

The core idea isn't that bad, but some of the jokes fell hopelessly flat while others were the sort of jokes you nervously laugh at if a colleague at work blurts one out during coffee time.

Ack.
As I said at the top of the review, you really don't want this getting into the hands of your little ones!

Slightly worrying that I can think of a handful of folk who would probably love this as a christmas pressie stocking filler, and I can well imagine it doing very well in the run up to the yuletide season. It wanted to be cleverer than it actually was though, parodies really only work on me if they're smartly intelligent AND funny, not just the equivalent of someone farting into a cushion then holding it over your face.

"Bad Little Children's Books" by Arthur C. Gackley is out now, published by Abrams.
Read More

Thursday, 7 July 2016

Saga Volume 6 by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

No comments:
Hello dark blog, it's been a while. I had to come and revisit you purely to talk about Saga Volume 6 which dropped into my hands a couple of days ago.

There comes a time in every comic fan's life where they reach a point in a long-running series where they start to wonder if they're just spinning their wheels waiting for 'something' to happen.

Saga, one of the most refreshing and original comics in decades, has wowed me consistently. Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples have designed a grown-up comic world that has always felt like it's talking about ordinary everyday life situations put through a blender on the highest speed setting, whizzed up into a surreal sci-fi smoothie that you can't help but guzzle down in one greedy gulp.

Actually make that 6 greedy gulps so far because, without following the comics themselves and just waiting for each collection as I do, you really are on a slow burn with this series as we follow the exploits of an interstellar child, the product of a man and a woman who should be trying to kill, not kiss, each other.

Hazel is the pint-sized narrator for Saga, talking about her life from birth to now - and the 'now' sees Hazel as a toddling kindergarten kid who has probably seen and experienced far more than any kid should have.

Her parents, Marko and Alana switch from being fugitives on the run in this volume, to parents who will stop at nothing to get their daughter back after she was kidnapped at the end of Volume 5.

Hounded by Prince Robot IV, the once-enemies now join forces to find their children, marooned across the galaxy.

Saga's genius has always been in the way that it underpins the main storyline with sub-plots that feel scintillatingly saucy and no holds barred. We catch up with The Will, who has become fat and docile and even more mentally unstable than ever before since the death of his sister and his former lover. The Will is also hunting for Prince Robot IV's offspring to exact a terrible revenge.

Hazel's story is still as fresh and vital as in previous volumes though there were times where I felt this volume lost a head of steam it had been gathering nicely. Still though, there are seldom few comics that can do uber-violent sexy and feminist all within the space of a few pages. In some ways it keeps reminding me of a more adult and risque version of Lexx, the genius surreal sci fi series from the 90s that really ended way before it was due. I'm not really sure why.

Vaughan and Staples know where they're heading with this. We don't yet, but I get the feeling that this is a series that could carry on for a very long time to come. So in answer, it hasn't quite reached that point where the series has lost traction. Grab the collected first three volumes now, and then guzzle down the rest as soon as you possibly can.
Read More